Loving your work is great, but being able to say your work helped you grow as a person? That’s phenomenal.

In most cases, when you love your work, you’re driven to create a successful work environment. While this holds true for both co-located and remote workers, there is one key difference. In a co-located space you have less flexibility in everything you do.

In a previous post, I discussed how flexibility and remote work coexist hand-in-hand. That connection also carries over into how remote work spurs personal growth. As a remote worker, you have more flexibility and, because of that, you’re more accountable.

As a remote worker, you’re accountable for your own work. In a co-located space, while this isn’t always true, accountability can fall both up and down the ladder. When a difficult situation arises you can ask a supervisor, ask a friend, a subordinate, or others for help. On the flip-side, as a remote worker, when a difficult situation arises you only have two options:

  • Fail the task
  • Learn to adapt

A remote team can be in different time zones, working different hours, or on-the-go. Apps like Slack and RemoteHQ have made collaboration easier, but someone isn’t around. That means you’re on your own, and you need to meet your deliverable date. This experience inevitably drives you to be a better, stronger employee and worker.

Dictionary.com defines an entrepreneur as:

A person who organizes and manages any enterprise, especially a business, usually with considerable initiative and risk

Based on this, remote work makes everyone an entrepreneur. This is a mindset that helps to drive your company forward as a whole, forcing your team and product to be better. Remote.co reported that this mindset led 30% of workers to say remote work allowed them to do more in less time.

If you want to do more, in less time, consider trying out remote work. Once you get used to working on your own time, wherever you get work done, I promise you won’t be going back!